Electoral Dysfunction

08. Jun 2017

Press Release: Electoral Dysfunction

LADBIBLE RUNS OWN GENERAL ELECTION POLL WITH HUGE SOCIAL MEDIA COMMUNITY IN UK

 

10,900 RESPONDENTS REVEALS LABOUR LEAD AMONGST YOUNG VOTERS & MAIN ISSUE OF CONCERN IS NHS

 

SPEAKS TO FIRST-TIME VOTERS AND YOUNG APATHETIC – RATHER THAN THE POLITICIANS – ABOUT HOW POLITICS REALLY AFFECTS THEM

 

LADbible has announced the results of an online poll surveying its huge young, social media community on who they supported in the General Election. The poll formed part of LADbible’s ‘Electoral Dysfunction’ multi-platform campaign, using online, editorial, Instagram Stories, Facebook and Twitter to talk about young voters in the General Election.

 

LADbible has surveyed 10,900 people with an online poll, in association with Apester, which has been promoted through the huge reach of their social channels. 59% of respondents had confirmed their support for Labour, with 26% opting for the Tories. 5% aligned themselves with the Lib Dems, whilst 3% confirmed they would not be voting.  54% of the 10,900 respondents are aged between 18 and 20, 23% are between 21 and 25 and 18% are aged 25 to 24, with 5% over 35.

 

The primary issue for the respondents in the election was the NHS (31%), with Brexit negotiations second (18%) followed by scrapping of tuition fees (13%).

 

The move from LADbible, the global youth media, news and entertainment brand and voice of a social generation, to run their own poll is a positive effort to drive social change after the largely apathetic response of young people in the last General Election, with only 43% of 18-24 year olds voting in 2015. It’s also the first time that many of the LADbible audience can vote so the media group was keen to make young people the star of the General Election – not Theresa May or Jeremy Corbyn – and understand their perspective on the political parties, the leaders and the campaign policies and what informs their decision over whether to vote and who to vote for.

 

The poll follows a huge drive from LADbible in May to encourage their young audience to register to vote. Upholding the brand vision to drive social change in a social media community, LADbible used Instagram Stories to ask their audience to register and successfully direct 40,000 followers to the Govt. website. The editorial stance of ‘Electoral Dysfunction’ has since been focused on encouraging their audience to vote, rather than telling them who to vote for. The tenth largest site in the UK has been using its position of influence with the social media generation to document changes in voting behaviour amongst this community, with original video content and editorial, including:

 

VIDEO

PINTS & POLITICS

LADbible employed the innovative and original stance on mainstream news it is famous for, by engaging the public with a series of unconventional General Election questions intended to make party leaders more relatable to the ‘LAD’ community. LADbible ventured from pub to pub across London, asking “What are Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn’s choice of drink?”

Watch video here: https://www.facebook.com/LADbible/videos/3230171577030010/

 

EDITORIAL

SPEAKING TO THE LADS DEFYING STEREOTYPES AROUND THE ELECTION

LADbible commands 50% of 18-30 year olds on social media, with an even split amongst females and males and the media brand wanted to unpick some of the stereotypes amongst its audience that led to assumptions around voting behaviour. One includes a short interview with Nickesh Mistry, a 22-year working class son of immigrants whose parents arrived in the UK in the 1960s, who is planning to vote for the Conservatives because he is in favour of “controlling our borders”; whilst 31-year-old Lib Dem-supporting teacher Ian Tarver voted for Brexit because he felt “that all countries should be responsible for their own laws.”

The full article is here: http://www.ladbible.com/now/politics-we-spoke-to-the-lads-defying-political-stereotypes-around-the-election-20170606

 

HOW GRIME EMERGED AS A POLITICAL FORCE DURING THE 2017 ELECTION

Another LADbible ‘Electoral Dysfunction’ article is a case study on the positive impact that grime musicians have had towards changing the attitudes of young people and voting, after a huge and unlikely social movement from the grime community on Twitter. LADbible spoke with a selection of first time voters including 18-year old Salal Amjad told us that he was initially deterred from voting as he didn’t trust the news media’s “clear bias” but changed his mind after the relentless campaigning from JME, concluding “JME is someone close to the people, and this made me realise that people of my generation were part of this system, too.”

Full article here:

http://www.ladbible.com/community/politics-how-grime-emerged-as-a-political-force-ahead-of-the-general-election-20170605

 

Further articles being published on ladbible.com on voting day include “Politics is Increasingly Becoming A Battle Between Young And Old But Under 30s Could Swing This Election” and “The Six Types Of LADs You See Whenever Around A General Election.”

END

 

NOTES TO EDITORS

ABOUT LADbible GROUP

Founded in 2012, LADbible Group is redefining entertainment and news for the social generation on an unprecedented scale.  Our global community engages billions of times every month with original and user-generated content spanning editorial, video, documentary and live.  We have quickly become one of the largest publishers of social video in the world, and we have a presence on all major social platforms. Our brands include LADbible, SPORTbible, Pretty52, the branded content agency Joyride, and content licensing arm CONTENTbible.

 

People work at LADbible Group to make a positive difference in the world, whether it be a funny video that gets viewed and shared millions of times or by enabling our community to engage in issues important to them such as the environment and mental health. With headquarters in Manchester, LADbible Group also has an office in London, and a community all around the world.

 

For more info, please contact Lenny Smith, Head of PR (interim) at [email protected]